What Is PRP?

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a promising treatment option for individuals suffering from acute and chronic pain. But what exactly is PRP, and how does it work?

PRP is a concentration of platelets in plasma, which is a component of your blood. Platelets are small, disk-shaped cells that are involved in the process of blood clotting. They also contain growth factors, which are proteins that play a key role in tissue repair and healing (1).

The process of obtaining PRP involves drawing a small amount of blood from the patient and placing it in a centrifuge to separate the platelets from the other blood cells. The concentrated platelets are then injected back into the patient at the site of the injury or pain.

PRP has been shown to have anti-inflammatory effects and to promote tissue repair and healing (2). It has been used in a variety of medical fields, including orthopedics, dentistry, and plastic surgery, to treat a range of conditions, including tendinitis, osteoarthritis, and ligament injuries (3)

PRP has also been used as a treatment option for individuals suffering from acute and chronic pain. In a review of the literature, PRP was found to be effective in reducing pain and improving function in patients with chronic low back pain (4). It has also been shown to be effective in reducing pain and improving function in individuals with knee osteoarthritis (5).

While PRP is a promising treatment option for individuals suffering from acute and chronic pain, more research is needed to fully understand its mechanisms of action and to determine the optimal dosing and frequency of treatment.

In conclusion, PRP is a concentration of platelets in plasma that contains growth factors and has anti-inflammatory effects. It has been used to treat a variety of conditions and has shown promise in reducing pain and improving function in individuals with chronic low back pain and knee osteoarthritis. Further research is needed to fully understand the mechanisms of action and optimal dosing and frequency of treatment.

References:

1. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. (2018). Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection. Retrieved from

2. Dohan, D. S., Choukroun, J., Diss, A., Dohan, S. L., Dohan, A. J., & Mouhyi, J. (2009). Platelet-rich plasma (PRP): what is PRP and what is not PRP? An overview of basic science and clinical applications. Orthopaedic Proceedings, 91(Supplement 1), 1-4.

3. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. (2018). Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection. Retrieved from

4. Cho, H. J., Koo, K. H., Kim, H. J., & Koo, K. H. (2017). Efficacy of platelet-rich plasma for chronic low back pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Medicine, 96(48), e8763.

5. Dhillon, M. S., Johnson, M. J., Little, C. B., et al. (2017). The effectiveness of platelet-rich plasma in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, 25(8), 2217-2225.

Dr. Raj Desai